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Cuba Organica

Because of limited land in urban areas, and to increase productivity, crops are planted close together.

Read the full story, "De Facto Organic."

Photos by Jesse Kurtz-Nicholl and Sarah Rodman.

Comments

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  • Jose

    Chile 05/12/2011 12:12:20 PM

    This is how collaborative work helps communities when people are related one by one in a solidarity way and not just money relation.

  • Mel Kramer, PhD, MPH

    Lake Worth, FL 05/31/2011 02:00:38 PM

    Nice Article, however from a Public Health perspective missed the mark. Having been to Cuba on a humanitarian mission, they are critically short on all medications, and in fact churches, synagogues and community centers receiving pharmaceuticals from visiting American volunteers provide a significant quantity of the medication to the population. They still have rations for food, a protein poor diet and in fact the “green markets” are a luxury for those who have disposable cash. Farmers sell extra produce on the highway to make extra cash. Clearly, the embargo is harming the average Cuban’s health and well being, and sustainable agriculture is a step going forward but not in lieu of much need pharmaceuticals. The technology in the health centers are circa 1960/1970.

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