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Invisible Wounds

Invisible Wounds

By Jackie Powder

Thousands of veterans suffered combat-related traumatic brain injuries—a signature wound of America’s most recent wars—that were never documented. Then two young researchers unearthed the evidence.

Killer in the Water

Killer in the Water

By Maryalice Yakutchik

A physician/scientist’s ongoing studies among American Indian communities in the Northern Plains indicate that even low levels of arsenic in drinking water apparently have serious health implications.

Silent Crimes

Silent Crimes

By Michelle Ferng

Longevity, once hailed as a milestone of human achievement, is now showing an ugly side, especially in fast-growing economies. Lima, Peru, is one vibrant city struggling to prevent abuse of its elders.

Give Dads a Chance

Give Dads a Chance

By Kathryn Edin

It’s time to discover an entirely different reality about poverty in the U.S. because much of what we think we know about it is just plain wrong. A case in point: so-called “deadbeat dads.”

What's the Polio Endgame?

What's the Polio Endgame?

Where will the last polio battles be fought? How should we best use the two main vaccines? Five global experts share their predictions and prescriptions for the paralyzing disease’s last stand.

The Art of Smallpox

The Art of Smallpox

By Salma Warshanna-Sparklin

No need to travel to India to see the Goddess of Smallpox. She and other smallpox art and artifacts are here, from a new exhibit by the Institute of the History of Medicine at the Johns Hopkins University. 

Preemie Safety

Preemie Safety

By Alexander Gelfand

Congress regulates how much DEHP can be in children’s toys—but not medical devices. A neonatologist says it’s time to rid neonatal intensive care units of this toxic endocrine disruptor.

Safer Harbors

Safer Harbors

By Maryalice Yakutchik

Researchers at the Moore Center for the Prevention of Child Sexual Abuse undertake a comprehensive evaluation of legislation that affects children who are commercially sexually exploited.

Into the Mild

Into the Mild

By Emily Mullin

The lab is way too sterile, and the natural world, too raw and wild. But this halfway house in Macha, Zambia, is just right when it comes to luring mosquitoes to give up the secrets of malaria.

Game Changer

Game Changer

The Gates Foundation’s Chris Elias and family planning expert Jose “Oying” Rimon of the Bloomberg School assess FP2020’s mission of increasing contraceptive access for 120 million women.

Open Mike: The "I" Word

The "I" Word

A Note from Dean Michael J. Klag, MD, MPH ’87

Eyes quickly glaze over whenever I mention the word “infrastructure,” but West Africa’s Ebola epidemic has taught the world how critical infrastructure—in all its varied meanings—really is.

Pain in the Brain

Pain in the Brain

By Andrew Myers

How to tell heartbreak from heartburn? A biostatistician pairs advanced brain scans using fMRI with powerful computer algorithms, turning the neuroscience of pain on its head.

Ebola: Five Lessons

Ebola: Five Lessons

By Andrew Myers

More than a year into West Africa’s devastating outbreak, humanity still has lots to learn about handling a crisis of this scale. Here are perspectives from some people who paid attention.

Cancer's Uncounted

Cancer's Uncounted

By Cathy Shufro

Data about cancer prevalence in developing countries is sparse. Two recent studies investigating breast masses in Rwanda, Sierra Leone and Nepal suggest that unmet needs are widespread.

Share and Tell

Share and Tell

By Salma Warshanna-Sparklin

50 MPH students met with nearly 400 East Baltimore kids to discuss brains, bats, asthma and the future during the Career and Culture Fair at Elmer A. Henderson: A Johns Hopkins Partnership School.

Mistakes. Aargh!

Mistakes. Aargh!

By Brian W. Simpson, MPH ’13, Editor

Why a meditation on mistakes? To assure readers that the Dean even fact checks our fact-checking to make sure what you read in this magazine is accurate, all the time.