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TRULY AMAZING

Truly an amazing article [“The Patient Researcher,” Spring 2017]. I wish there were more opportunities to link the public and advocates to research. Great work. Judy [Ochs], you are one tough lady!

Alex Nicole / Via Magazine Comments

I am truly amazed and inspired by this article. Beautifully written, it illustrates the deep compassion and drive in researchers and cancer patients alike. Each inspires the other, and the result is positive energy and strength to continue the task at hand. Kudos to everyone involved!

Sharon Poplovski Thompson / Via Magazine Comments

ON THE SIDELINES

I agree with Philadelphia health commissioner Tom Farley that public health victories require the support of policymakers who understand the implications of change [“The Equity Solution,” Spring 2017]. Not mentioned, though, is that organized public health too often sits on the sidelines of the policy arena. Leveraging all tools available for influencing policy, including engagement in elections, is critical to sustained advancement of public health goals.

Eric Gorovitz, JD, MPH ‘94 / Via Magazine Comments

A TAXING PROBLEM

Except for environmental conditions, which continue to be improved by a free people who refuse to accept pollution of their air, water, etc., the other problems [“Challenges for America,” Spring 2017] can only be addressed socially. Spending tax dollars directly will only buy more of the same. However, if taxes were to be used to solve the problems of “adolescent health,” obesity, drug addiction and violence, it would create real employment programs to give Americans, especially the youth, a second chance.

Joe Bill Scott / Via Magazine Comments

OPPORTUNITY FOR HEALTH

Except for environmental conditions, which continue to be improved by a free people who refuse to accept pollution of their air, water, etc., the other problems [“Challenges for America,” Spring 2017] can only be addressed socially. Spending tax dollars directly will only buy more of the same. However, if taxes were to be used to solve the problems of “adolescent health,” obesity, drug addiction and violence, it would create real employment programs to give Americans, especially the youth, a second chance.

The aggregate economic demand on the health care delivery system in America is an increasing burden. President Trump has the opportunity to establish a health program with the potential for global adoption, as people partner with their health care providers toward a healthier America.

Dr. Popejoy / Via Magazine Comments

Correction: Dr. Shunichi Fukuhara is former dean of the Kyoto University School of Public Health, not the current dean as we wrote in “The MPH Goes East,” Spring 2017. And there are 10 physicians, not 9, in the first part-time MPH Kyoto cohort.

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